Departments Public Safety Fire Department Information

Safety Tips

Please click on one of the bold headings below to expand each section.

Carbon Monoxide

Each year in America, unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning claims more than 500 lives and sends another 15,000 people to hospital emergency rooms for treatment. The United States Fire Administration (USFA) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) would like you to know that there are simple steps you can take to protect yourself from deadly carbon monoxide fumes.

Continue reading at the official USFA website located here; http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/citizens/all_citizens/co/fswy17.shtm.

Christmas Tree Hazards & Holiday Fire Safety

What's a holiday party or even the traditional Christmas morning scene itself without a beautifully decorated tree? If your household, as those of more than 33 million other American homes, includes a natural tree in its festivities, take to heart the sales person's suggestion—"Keep the tree watered." That's good advice and not just to create a fragrant indoor winter wonderland atmosphere. Christmas trees account for 200 fires annually, resulting in 6 deaths, 25 injuries and more than $6 million in property damage. Typically shorts in electrical lights or open flames from candles, lighters or matches start tree fires. Well-watered trees are not a problem. Dry and neglected trees can be.

Continue reading at the official USFA website located here; http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/citizens/all_citizens/home_fire_prev/holiday-seasonal/treefire.shtm and http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/citizens/all_citizens/home_fire_prev/holiday-seasonal/holiday.shtm.

Smoke Detectors

In the event of a fire, properly installed and maintained smoke alarms will provide an early warning alarm to your household. This alarm could save your own life and those of your loved ones by providing the chance to escape.

Why Should My Home Have Smoke Alarms?
In the event of a fire, a smoke alarm can save your life and those of your loved ones. They are a very important means of preventing house and apartment fire fatalities by providing an early warning signal -- so you and your family can escape. Smoke alarms are one of the best safety devices you can buy and install to protect yourself, your family, and your home.

What Types of Smoke Alarms Are Available?
There are many different brands of smoke alarms available on the market but they fall under two basic types:  ionization and photoelectric.

Ionization alarms sound more quickly when a flaming, fast moving fire occurs. Photoelectric alarms are quicker at sensing smoldering, smoky fires. There are also combination smoke alarms that combine ionization and photoelectric into one unit, called dual sensor smoke alarms.

Because both ionization and photoelectric smoke alarms are better at detecting distinctly different yet potentially fatal fires, and because homeowners cannot predict what type of fire might start in a home, the USFA recommends the installation of both ionization and photoelectric or dual sensor smoke alarms.

In addition to the basic types of alarms, there are alarms made to meet the needs of people with hearing disabilities. These alarms may use strobe lights that flash and/or vibrate to assist in alerting those who are unable to hear standard smoke alarms when they sound.

Okay, Where Do I Put Them?
Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement. Many fatal fires begin late at night or in the early morning. For extra safety, install smoke alarms both inside and outside sleeping areas. Since smoke and many deadly gases rise, installing your smoke alarms at the proper level will provide you with the earliest warning possible. Always follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions.

Where Would I Get Smoke Alarms?

Many hardware, home supply, or general merchandise stores carry smoke alarms. If you are unsure where to buy one in your community, call your local fire department (on a nonemergency telephone number) and they will provide you with some suggestions. Some fire departments offer smoke alarms for little or no cost.

Are Smoke Alarms Hard to Install?
If your smoke alarms are hard wired, that is wired into the electrical system, you will need to have a qualified electrician do the initial installation or install replacements.  For battery powered smoke alarms, all you will need for installation is a screw driver. Some brands are self adhesive and will easily stick to the wall or ceiling where they are placed.  For all smoke alarm installations, be sure you follow the manufacturer’s instructions because there are differences between the various brands.

How Do I Keep My Smoke Alarm Working?
If you have a smoke alarm with batteries:
Smoke Alarms powered by long-lasting batteries are designed to replace the entire unit according to manufacturer’s instructions.
In standard type battery powered smoke alarms, the batteries need to be replaced at least once per year and the whole unit should be replaced every 8-10 years.
In hard-wired, battery back up smoke alarms, the batteries need to be checked monthly, and replaced at least once per year. The entire unit should be replaced every 8-10 years.

How Long will my Smoke Alarm Last?
Most alarms installed today have a life span of about 8-10 years. After this time, the entire unit should be replaced. It is a good idea to write the date of purchase with a marker on the inside of your alarm so you will know when to replace it. Some of the newer alarms already have the purchase date written inside. In any event, always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for replacement.

Fire Extinguishers

The use of a fire extinguisher in the hands of a trained adult can be a life and property saving tool. However, a majority of adults have not had fire extinguisher training and may not know how and when to use them. Fire extinguisher use requires a sound decision making process and training on their proper use and maintenance.

Should I Use a Fire Extinguisher?

Consider the following three questions before purchasing or using a fire extinguisher to control a fire:

  • What type of fire extinguisher is needed?
  • Is the fire at a point where it might still be controlled by a fire extinguisher?
  • Am I physically capable of using the extinguisher?


Different types of fires require different types of extinguishers. For example, a grease fire and an electrical fire require the use of different extinguishing agents to be effective and safely put the fire out.

Basically, there are five different types of extinguishing agents. Most fire extinguishers display symbols to show the kind of fire on which they are to be used. By looking at the symbol on the fire extinguisher you can tell what types of fires you can expect it to work well on.

Familiarizing yourself with a fire extinguisher is critical. In an emergency time is invaluable and there won't be time to read the directions. As explained above there are many different types of extinguishers, however they all operate in a similar manner. An easy method of remembering is the "PASS" acronym.

Pull the Pin at the top of the extinguisher. The pin releases a locking mechanism and will allow you to discharge the extinguisher.

Aim at the base of the fire, not the flames. This is important - in order to put out the fire, you must extinguish the fuel.

Squeeze the lever slowly. This will release the extinguishing agent in the extinguisher. If the handle is released, the discharge will stop.

Sweep from side to side. Using a sweeping motion, move the fire extinguisher back and forth until the fire is completely out. Operate the extinguisher from a safe distance, several feet away, and then move towards the fire once it starts to diminish. Be sure to read the instructions on your fire extinguisher - different fire extinguishers recommend operating them from different distances.

For more information regarding portable fire extinguishers you can visit the following USFA website; http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/citizens/all_citizens/home_fire_prev/extinguishers.shtm.

Calls For Service

Fire 62
Rescue 15
Hazmat 6
Dive 0
Ready Squad 172
Total Calls 259
Last Updated 01/06/2014
Total Calls For 2013 259

Have A Question?

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Contact

209 2nd Ave NW
Jamestown, ND 58401

Phone: (701) 252-1441
Fax: (701) 252-4786

The main station is open Monday-Friday from 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM.

Fire Chief - Jim Reuther
jreuther@daktel.com
Training Officer - Sheldon Mohr
smohr@daktel.com
Inspections - Thomas Steckler
tsteckler@daktel.com